My New Job

20 04 2016

I’ve been in my new job for five weeks now.

For the past five weeks I’ve come to this building:

YL Service Center

Every day for the last five weeks I’ve said good morning to the receptionist inside the front door. I’ve climbed the stairs to the second floor. I’ve used my badge to get through two security doors. And I’ve come to my cubicle:

Cubicle.jpg

After the first few days it was actually labeled as my cubicle:

Name Plate.jpg

I’ve never had a cubicle before.

I’ve never had a desk job before.

…but now I do. And I love it. (At least most of the time).

Let me tell you why.

I work at an organization called Young Life. Young Life’s mission is to introduce adolescents to Jesus Christ and to help them grow in their faith. This is important to me. I believe the way of Jesus is the best way. I believe the life that is possible through Jesus is the best life possible. I’ve felt that way for a long time. It’s the reason I got into youth ministry in the first place (though maybe I wouldn’t have said it that way in the beginning).

I’m still in youth ministry.

I might sit at a desk in a cubicle in a building all day… but I’m still in youth ministry. I might “just” be an administrative assistant… but I’m still in youth ministry. I’ve just got a different role for this season. (Let’s be honest… I was growing frustrated with church-based ministry – again – so this is probably a good change for a time).

In my role as an administrative assistant I get to play a support role. From my place behind the scenes I get to support and serve those that are “in the field.” …those that are more actively interacting with adolescents. I spend my day on the computer with spreadsheets and databases. I send approximately one million emails every day. If I’m lucky, I answer one phone call… a week. (I really, really don’t like phone calls).

But here’s the really cool thing – at least as far as I’m concerned. The people that I email every day… the people that I get to support and encourage… they live here:

Central and South America

And here:

Africa and Middle East

And here:

Asia

That is, I work with people ALL OVER THE WORLD. Every day.

More about that next time.





Kentucky to Colorado

13 04 2016

We’ve been back in Colorado for almost a month now.

In many ways it doesn’t seem like it has been that long. It feels like it was only a few days ago that we loaded up our moving truck and headed across the country. I can still picture Harrodsburg Christian Church as if we were there this past Sunday. I feel as if I could walk down the street to get some ice cream at the Fudge Company… or make a quick trip to El Charro to grab some fajitas. I’m anxious for the weather to warm up so we can hop on our bikes and ride the rolling hills of Kentucky. (…only we don’t live in Kentucky anymore).

I’ll miss those rolling hills… and I’ll miss ice cream from the Fudge Company… and fajitas from El Charro. But mostly I’ll miss the people of Harrodsburg Christian Church. I am so thankful for the blessing they were to Katie and I for two years. They became our family. They supported and encouraged us when we most needed it. They accepted us just as we were.  …heck, they even let us preach together a couple of times!!!

We’ve been back in Colorado for almost a month now.

In many ways it seems like it has been much longer. This place is so much home for us it almost feels like we’ve not been gone. In the four weeks that we’ve been back we’ve had dinner at friends’ houses at least six times. We’ve already had friends over to our house multiple times too. We’ve been hiking in a few of our favorite spots, explored the bike path that runs by our house, and revisited some of our favorite restaurants and coffee shops.

It’s good to be home.

We’ve been back in Colorado for almost a month now. In that month I’ve been busy learning and growing into my new job… my new role… my new ministry. More about that next time.





Lessons from… Pawn Stars?

24 09 2012

I’ve been watching a lot of the Histroy Channel lately (the place Katie and I are currently staying has cable – something we’re not used to). The History Channel seems to run shows in marathons… one episode of a certain show will be followed by another episode, and another, and another. Shows like American Pickers, Top Gear, and Pawn Stars.

The other day I was watching Pawn Stars. A woman brought a Faberge spider brooch into the store, hoping the sell it. It was a hand-me-down, which she didn’t know a whole lot about. When asked what she wanted to sell it for, she said $2000. The owner’s response?

‘I’m not going to give you two thousand for it. Unfortunately I have a conscience. I’ll give you fifteen thousand.’

The woman wanted $2000 for the item. The pawn shop owner offered her $15,000.

Which begs the question, if this wasn’t being filmed, would he have still offered $15,000…. or would he have taken the $2,000 steal? Did the presence of the cameras affect him? Did exposure to the public eye make a difference?

Would it for us? What if all of our actions were open to the public – would it make a difference in how we live?





Love Does by Bob Goff

25 05 2012

Whimsy. Simply put, Bob Goff’s “Love Does” is a collection of stories about whimsy. Could all of these stories possibly be true? Did he and his children really send letters to world leaders, inviting them to have ice cream? Does he actually ride a long board to work, because his car was stolen and he wants to learn to be more dependent on others? Yes, I believe so. Bob shares stories about himself, his family, and his friends that demonstrate how whimsical actions of love can change lives and make the world a better place. Along with each story, Bob provides commentary on how it relates to his Christian faith and what it means to follow Jesus. 

I absolutely loved this book. It was well written and an easy read (it felt very much like a Donald Miller book) – one that ended much too soon. At times I felt the way he relates the stories to his Christian faith was a bit cheesy… but in the end it made me love Bob Goff that much more. Love Does compels the reader to get out, love whimsically, and make a difference in the world. I would most certainly recommend this book.

I need to mention that BookSneeze® provided me with a complimentary copy of this book as part of a blogging/reviewing program.





I Dream of a Church (#15)

26 04 2012

In my “I Dream of a Church” series I having been writing about a collection of thoughts, ideas, and questions I’ve had from the last several years about what a church might look like (given an ideal situation). I don’t claim for any of these to be original, ground-breaking, or otherwise amazing. You can find other entries in this series by clicking here.

#15. I dream of a church where…

Micro-loans/Grants are offered to the community.

Let’s imagine you – or someone like you – are living paycheck to paycheck and your daughter gets sick. Not just the simple runny nose and a cough kind of sick, but sick to the point where you need to take her to the hospital at 3 a.m. Let’s say, because you had to take your sick daughter to the hospital, that you rack up lots of debt (or even a little debt) … and that this puts you in a deep hole. Because you – or someone like you – are living paycheck to paycheck. One option, which many in this situation use, is to go to a place like Payday Loans and take out a loan on their paycheck. Unfortunately such loans are dangerous (to put it lightly)… charging outlandish fees, interest, and penalties. Using this option will end you – or someone like you – in a much, much deeper hole.

So, I dream of a church that offers a couple of options:

1) What if the church offered micro-loans to people in the community? (You can decide how you define the community – whether it is only people in the church, or includes the people in the surrounding neighborhoods… I choose the second). These loans would be interest free and could counter the dangers of places like Payday Loans.

2) What if the church offered grants/gifts to people in the community? (Yes, many churches already do something like this and have a special account set aside for it). The recipients could, if they are able, either pay the money back to the church or “pay it forward” to someone else in need. If they aren’t able to, no sweat.

A couple of dangers:

– Loans/grants/gifts could foreseeably lead to a sort of shame. If this happens, people might not feel comfortable in the church.

– Grants/gifts could potentially allow folks to take less responsibility for the money (as opposed to being aware that they need to pay back a loan).

Thoughts?





I Dream of a Church (#14)

22 04 2012

In my “I Dream of a Church” series I having been writing about a collection of thoughts, ideas, and questions I’ve had from the last several years about what a church might look like (given an ideal situation). I don’t claim for any of these to be original, ground-breaking, or otherwise amazing. You can find other entries in this series by clicking here.

#14. I dream of a church where…

Easter weekend becomes an “all-weekender.”

What if a church had some sort of “all-weekender” (like an all-nighter) over Easter weekend? Something that starts on Good Friday and goes until Easter morning. Something that really sets the tone/atmosphere for the significance of these days? (Yes, actually have members stay at the church all weekend…) On Friday evening and Saturday the mood would be somber (low lighting, quiet, etc.) and then Saturday at midnight/Sunday at sunrise the lights come on, colors come out, and there’s a giant celebration. Throughout the weekend there would be various services to help remind us of what’s happening on these special days.

*Instead of having folks stay at the church, you could also just have several services that they come to attend (one Friday night, two or three on Saturday, and one Sunday morning).

What do you think?





Called to Controversy by Ruth Rosen

9 04 2012

Ruth Rosen’s “Called to Controversy: The Unlikely Story of Moishe Rosen and the Founding of Jews for Jesus” is a biography about Moishe Rosen. The book takes us from his early days as a child in Denver, follows his developing relationship with the woman that would become his wife, recounts their conversion to Christianity from Judaism, details his exemplary role in evangelism to the Jewish community, and describes the last years, weeks, and hours of his life.

I enjoyed reading about Moishe and his influence on evangelism to the Jewish community, even though I’d never heard of his beforehand! I reckon that if I had known anything about him, this behind the scenes look at his life (it was written by his daughter) would have been even more interesting. One might expect to see only the good qualities of Moishe, but we are shown glimpses of both the positive and negative. Indeed, as one turns the last few pages, he begins to feel like he has actually gotten to know this man called Moishe.

The book is written in such a way as to make reading easy and enjoyable, with a few editing errors here and there. I need to mention that BookSneeze® provided me with a complimentary copy of this book as part of a blogging/reviewing program.